Videos of Three Online Readers

This site provides the videos of online reading comprehension, below, that are described in the following chapter:

Leu, D. J., Zawilinski, L., Castek, J., Banerjee, M., Housand, B., Liu, Y., and O’Neil. M (in press). What is new about the new literacies of online reading comprehension? In A. Berger, L. Rush, & J. Eakle (Eds.). Secondary school reading and writing: What research reveals for classroom practices. National Council of Teachers of English/National Conference of Research on Language and Literacy: Chicago, IL.

You may download a prepublication draft of this chapter here.

Riko
Click here for a video of student "Riko" reading online.
Click here to view the score sheet for Riko in a separate window (PDF file coming soon).

Riko is an example of a high achieving offline
reader who also is highly proficient with online reading comprehension.  His example supports the prevailing assumption that online and offline reading is the same.  This hypothesis would predict that high achieving offline readers would also be high achieving online readers and that low achieving offline readers would also be low achieving online readers.

Marcos
Click here to view a video of student "Marcos" reading online.
Click here to view the score sheet for Marcos in a separate window (PDF file).

Marcos is a high achieving offline reader but a surprisingly low achieving online reader.  His case  provides evidence that there are additional new reading comprehension skills required during online reading comprehension.

Tomas
Click here for a video of student "Tomas" reading online.
Click here to view the score sheet for Tomas is a separate window (PDF File).

Tomas is an example of a very weak offline reader, being provided with supportive services as a student with a specific learning disability in reading.  Surprisingly, however, he was among the top 15% of online readers in our sample. His example shows us that readers who struggle with offline materials may not struggle with online materials to the same extent, as long as they have the skills and strategies essential to online reading comprehension.

To properly view the videos, you will need the free "Flash Player" software: Click here to get Flash Player

To view the PDF documents, you will need the free "Acrobat Reader" software: Click here to get Adobe Reader


This work is part of ongoing research conducted at The New Literacies Research Lab at the University of Connecticut.  Our work seeks to improve the quality of literacy education by helping schools and teachers integrate the new literacies of the Internet and other ICTs into classroom learning. The videos were captured using Camtasia software.

Portions of this material are based upon work supported by the Institute for Education Sciences and the U.S. Department of Education under Award No. R305G050154, the North Central Regional Educational Lab/Learning Point Associates, and the Carnegie Corporation. Opinions expressed herein are solely those of the authors and do not necessarily represent the position of either the U.S. Department of Education, the North Central Regional Educational Lab, or the Carnegie Corporation.